Presentations


A key element of AST’s efforts is the dissemination of information. AST presents frequently at conferences, tradeshows, and in online webinars. We present in these venues to demonstrate our constantly improving captioning system, to share the research data we gather as we explore captioning techniques, and disseminate the captioning information and techniques we have uncovered. We have tried to archive many of these presentations here for your convenience.

This session discusses the value of captioning beyond regulatory compliance for improved learning, and shows options for captioning. With the rapid deployment of new media types and the increasing ease of publishing multimedia content, the scope of the captioning problem in education is growing at an exponential rate. The need for understanding how to provide quick, useful, and compliant captioning without creating undue workflow or budget burdens has never been more important.

Presenter(s): Brent Robertson
Presented: Wednesday, 14 July 2010
At: AHEAD 2010 (See our upcoming events)
Document(s): http://www.automaticsync.com/captionsync/wp-content/uploads/Concurrent-Session.pdf


Video is becoming more and more popular for use in academic instruction. As universities integrate video into instruction, they struggle to make the media accessible. Disability laws require that most universities make their media accessible to students with disabilities. For video, this means that captions must be added. For podcasts and audio files, a transcript meets the minimal requirements for accessibility.  Developing policies, practices and finding budget funds to captioning media in tough economic times stresses many universities.  Captioning media is critical to support the deaf and hard of hearing communities. But the benefits of captioning extend far beyond supporting just these viewers. Most viewers of captions are not deaf or hard of hearing. This paper covers benefits of captioning and best practices for captioning.

Presenter(s): Kevin Erler, Ph.D.
Presented: Thursday, 01 July 2010
At: Ed-Media 2010 (See our upcoming events)
Document(s): http://www.automaticsync.com/captionsync/wp-content/uploads/Ed-Media-2010-paper.pdf
Document(s): http://www.editlib.org/p/35213

Captioning is typically done to meet accessibility requirements, but the value extends far beyond just supporting deaf students. With the expanding use of video for instruction and communications, captioning your YouTube, iTunes and recorded lectures will make the content more usable. Captions serve as the basis for enabling video to be searched, translated, and serves different learning styles for both native English speakers and ESL students. This session will focus on the value of captioning media, the processes of automating the captioning workflow, and the uses with different portals like iTunes, YouTube, Google Video, and other portals.

Presenter(s): Kevin Erler, Ph.D.
Presented: Wednesday, 09 June 2010
At: EduComm 2010 (See our upcoming events)
Document(s): http://www.automaticsync.com/captionsync/wp-content/uploads/AST-EduComm10.pdf
Document(s): http://educomm2010.sched.org/event/19d235f7da48733fa9d9f0b1f49d2350

Video is becoming more and more popular for use in academic instruction. A recent study on the use of video in higher education shows that the video explosion is hitting all aspects of education. Cisco projections show that video growth is contributing to 30% of data transfers in 2009, and by 2010 will be over 50%.  Students are expecting to have access to instruction with video, and are creating, uploading and sharing videos as a part of their daily lives.

As universities integrate video into instruction, they struggle to make the media accessible. American's with disabilities laws require that most universities make their media accessible to students with disabilities. For video, this means that captions must be added. For Podcasts and audio files, a transcript meets the minimal requirements for accessibility. Developing policies, practices and finding budget funds to captioning media in tough economic times stresses many universities.

Captioning media is critical to support the deaf and hard of hearing communities. But the benefits of captioning extend far beyond supporting just these viewers. Most viewers of captions are not deaf and hard of hearing. A study conducted at the California State University at San Francisco showed that when captions were made available for videos to a randomly assigned group of viewers, their grade point average was one G.P.A. higher for those with captions. In addition, these students exhibited a much more engaged level of interest in the content.

By adding captions and transcripts to media, which is supported in portals like iTunes and YouTube, the video content can now be made searchable. Captions also benefit ESL students and ESL faculty.

This session will cover the benefits of captioning media beyond merely supporting the deaf and hard of hearing.
Session ID: WEB-2041

Presenter(s): Pat Brogan, Ph.D.
Presented: Friday, 26 March 2010
At: CSUN 2010



Motivations and examples of captioning in government agencies.

Presenter(s): Pat Brogan Ph.D.
Presented: Monday, 05 October 2009
At: IDEAS 2009
Document(s): http://www.automaticsync.com/captionsync/wp-content/uploads/IDEAS.ppt


A discussion of the motivations for captioning and some examples from actual deployments in Education.

Presenter(s): Pat Brogan, Ph.D.
Presented: Wednesday, 17 June 2009
At: EduComm 2009
Document(s): http://www.automaticsync.com/captionsync/wp-content/uploads/Educomm.ppt
Document(s): http://educomm.mediasite.com/mediasite/Viewer/?peid=bbeda62f17f849bbade34e7312b3f992

Discussion on how to make lecture recordings accessible.

Presenter(s): Pat Brogan, Ph.D.
Presented: Saturday, 31 January 2009

Document(s): http://www.automaticsync.com/captionsync/wp-content/uploads/AccessibleLectures.pdf


The introduction of a lecture recording system at many universities has received considerable
endorsement from advocates of accessibility, with students with disabilities and/or medical
conditions being identified as major beneficiaries of this resource. To gain a better
understanding of the perceived benefits and shortcomings of recording lectures for this group
of students, and potential directions and applications for the future, a research project was
recently conducted at one university into this topic. This research acts as the basis for this
paper; the presentation will briefly overview the project and share key research findings.

Presenter(s): Mike Fardon; JoCasta Williams
Presented: Friday, 31 August 2007

Document(s): http://www.automaticsync.com/captionsync/wp-content/uploads/Lecture-Recordings-with-Students-with-Disabilities.pdf


This session addresses the following topics:

  • Accessibility compliance
  • Benefits of captioning beyond compliance
  • Examples of captioning different media: YouTube, iTunes, Recorded Lectures, Podcasts and more
  • Captioning process and workflow
  • Evaluating the impact on learning

Presenter(s): Pat Brogan, Ph.D.
Presented: Wednesday, 18 November 2009


Document(s): http://www.canyons.edu/Offices/Distance_Learning/Captioning/presentation/presentation.htm

Webinar that covers the following:
 1.  Introduction to captioning and transcription services
 2.  Captioning and Transcribing Process
 3.  Quality considerations
 4.  Approaches to large scale captioning
 5.  Motivations to caption/transcribe
 6.  The Media Explosion
 7.  Choosing what to caption and transcribe
 8.  How to fund this?
 9.  Q & A

Presenter(s): Pat Brogan, Ph.D.; Kevin Erler, Ph.D.
Presented: Thursday, 25 June 2009


Document(s): http://teachingcommons.cdl.edu/access/docs_multi/CaptioningWebinar.shtml

In 2004, AST, (Automatic Sync Technologies),  received funding from the US Department of Education to develop a captioning system that is more "accessible" to educational institutions that would result in lower cost and quicker turnaround than traditional captioning.  In the course of that project and in the time since, AST has explored in detail many approaches to captioning; this talk will outline the results of those investigations and highlight the pros and cons of each approach that we explored; issues of accuracy, cost, timeliness, and scalability are examined.  With the rapid introduction and deployment of new media types, and the increasing ease of publishing multimedia content, the scope of the captioning problem in education is growing at an exponential rate.  The need for understanding how to provide quick, useful, and compliant captioning without creating undue workflow or budget burdens has never been more important.

Presenter(s): Kevin Erler, Ph.D.
Presented: Thursday, 20 November 2008


Document(s): http://easi.cc/archive/caption/caption-webinar.htm

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