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Whiteboard Wednesday: Accommodations for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

In today’s Whiteboard Wednesday we are going to present several types of accommodations for deaf and hard of hearing students. To learn about all the methods of accommodation that are used by universities, we spoke with Angela Branson, Deaf Services Coordinator at University of Missouri. These are the types of accommodation we discussed, and how they work.

Note: The following video should be considered an alternative to the Annotated Transcript, which contains descriptions of visual references in the media. Also, the pages listed in the Resources section are primarily text-based, and will be useful to those who do not have access to the visual content.

Video:

Transcript:

>> Hi, this is Noelis with Automatic Sync. In today’s Whiteboard Wednesday we are going to present several types of accommodations for deaf and hard of hearing students. To learn about all the methods of accommodation that are used by universities, we spoke with Angela Branson, Deaf Services Coordinator at University of Missouri. These are the types of accommodation we discussed, and how they work.

Proximity

The easiest form of accommodation that is suitable for some students, is guaranteeing them a seat in front of the instructor with a clear view. Sitting close can help the student with either hearing or lip reading.

Note Taking

Note taking is probably the most common accommodation in the classroom. The notes are written by another student in the class and given to the student needing the assistance. This allows them to concentrate on the lecture without the need to take their own notes, which would mean taking their eyes off the instructor.

ASL Interpreter

For students who know American Sign Language, an interpreter is sometimes provided. The interpreter attends the class with the student and interprets all dialog during the lecture. This method helps the student understand what’s being said during the lecture, but it doesn’t produce any sort of transcript or notes. Because the student needs to be looking at the interpreter, a note taker is usually also provided simultaneously.

Remote Text Interpreting (C-PRINT and Typewell)

C-PRINT and Typewell are two meaning-for-meaning transcription services that are appropriate for some students in certain classes. This type of service is similar to CART, which we’ll describe next, in that it provides the learner with a near-real-time summary of what is being said in a class. Keep in mind though that these services do not provide a verbatim transcript of the dialog. AST refers to these services by the more generic term “Remote Text Interpreting,” and we can offer these services at a very affordable price.

CART

A CART service, which is short for Communication Access Real-time Translation, provides instantaneous translation of speech to text with a delay of only 2 seconds or less. CART is often done remotely, meaning a CART writer will listen in on the lecture via computer, and transcribe the instructor’s words verbatim. This allows the student to read the text on a computer in the classroom while it is being spoken. Remote CART accommodation not only allows the student to follow along in class, but it also provides a transcript. Remote CART is also a service that AST now provides.

Pre-Recorded Captioning

If the lecture is recorded, a transcript or captions can be produced by a professional transcriber after the lecture is over. The turnaround time is longer for this method, and the student will not have access to the service during the lecture, but it provides the most accurate, verbatim transcript, and the timing is perfectly synchronized with the video. This can help students who are learning lip reading with new vocabulary, and also helps other students who are not deaf or hard of hearing understand and retain the content better.

Which type of accommodation is used is largely dependent on the student, and can require some consultation and trial runs to find which works best for each individual. If you have questions about the types of accommodations that AST can provide for deaf and hard of hearing students, please don’t hesitate to reach out to us. Thank you for watching this Whiteboard Wednesday.

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